“I watched this movie at my school with other students and I was shocked. “One of the ten are working, but nine are not.” I’m one of nine. We have the power to end child labour. Let’s change this world.”

All over the world, young people, educators, government representatives, and campaigners are taking part in the 100 Million global week of action and global screening of the award-winning film, The Price of Free.

Made by the team who brought us An Inconvenient Truth and He Named Me Malala, the film follows the different narratives of parents, campaigners, and the children themselves, and depicts the story of how Nobel Peace Laureate Kailash Satyarthi went from being a young activist, angry at the injustice of child labour, to leading a team that has rescued over 86,000 children from forced labour and slavery in India. The Price of Free is a YouTube Original feature length documentary, which will be available on YouTube channel Soul Pancake.

To mark the film’s release, the global screening started taking place on the 14th November, from which people can watch for free online. Screenings are happening in parliaments, schools and communities around the world as part of the 100 Million campaign’s week of global action, and beyond.

The global screening started in Asia, with the 100 Million campaign in Japan hosting a screening in the national parliament building. In the coming weeks, 100 Million Japan is aiming to get 10,000 students actively engaged in the campaign – an incredible target for their first year!

Governments have also hosted screenings for their representatives in New Zealand and Fiji, with further screenings to be hosted by representatives for their local communities. Student-led screenings were also hosted in Pakistan, Taiwan, and Hong Kong.

In Africa, students are leading the way again, with screenings organised in Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia, Cameroon, Mali, Niger, Chad, Kenya, and Rwanda. On 17 November, in Accra, the All Africa Students’ Union is hosting a 100 Million campaign regional screening, with elected student representatives from across the continent joining them and the First and Second Ladies of Ghana.

In Europe, schools, colleges, NGOs, and community groups have started hosting screenings in the UK, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, Austria, Norway, Monaco, and France. On Friday 16 November, Kailash will be in Rome, participating in a screening with student leaders from all over the continent with the Organising Bureau of European School Student Unions.

In Latin America, governments in Chile and Peru will be screening the film this week, with youth activists from 100 Million in both countries, as well as in Brazil, showing the film in local communities all around their countries. Further screenings are being held in Argentina, Panama, and Colombia.

In the United States, students, government representatives, and campaigners from Boston to Honolulu took part in screenings.

Global and regional partners in the campaign include the international teachers’ union federation, Education International, the Inter-Parliamentary Union, and the All Africa Students’ Union; at the national level organisations supporting the campaign include Bread for the World (Germany), Corporación Opción (Chile), ACE (Japan), and national teachers’ unions around the world.

The Price of Free was made to accelerate change for the world’s most marginalised children, as part of the fight to end child labour by the 2025 deadline. In the last 20 years, the number of children forced to work has dropped by nearly 100 million in that time. But there are still over 150 million working to survive, instead of in school and learning.

100 Million believes that by working to end child labour, by working for every child to be safe, and by ensuring every child’s right to education is realised, we can end the cruel injustices done to children, and restore their right to childhood.

The Price of Free will be released as a YouTube Original on 27 November. In advance of the public release, the 100 Million campaign is offering schools, colleges, universities, organisations, campaign groups and community groups the opportunity to host an advance screening. If you would like to take part, please click here.

The film is available in the following languages:

  • English (including a fully dubbed version)
  • French, Spanish, Portuguese, Hindi (subtitled and dubbed versions)
  • Arabic, Chinese, Bengali, Dutch, German, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Nepali, Swedish (subtitled only).